Unpublished Academic Literature

Degree Dissertations from the School of Musical Studies of the

Faculty of Fine Arts

of the

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki


Table of Contents

Information

 

Konstandinidou, Roxani: Transcriptions and Musical and Textual Analysis of Songs from Vertiskos, Sohos, and Ossa, Thessaloniki Prefecture, Thessaloniki, 1999
166 pp. + photographs + 1 map

The writer studies 20 folksongs, which she categorises by theme: historical songs, love songs, wedding songs, songs of exile, songs with a gnomic, didactic, or social message, and laments. She records the musical text, either in toto or the first verse, notes the mode and the time of the song, reproduces the lyrics, analyses the melody and the rhythm, discusses the relationship between the musical and the poetic metre, and adds details of the folklore and history of the area. The singers and informants are all elderly villagers. The songs are in two groups: songs from Vertiskos and Ossa, and Carnival songs from Sohos. The writers concluding comments concern the lyrics (number of syllables, metre, rhyme, repetitions, and refrains), the music, the rhythm, and the relationship between the poetic and the musical metre.

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Mihaïl, Maria: Transcriptions of Folksongs: Folksongs from the Pieria Mountains, Thessaloniki, 1997
214 pp. + 1 photograph + 1 map (with a cassette of recorded music)

Contributing to the efforts to preserve folksongs, this dissertation deals with songs from the Pieria Mountains. The writer takes her material chiefly from earlier recordings of amateur musicians and singers (who were no longer alive when she was carrying out her research) made by the cultural association of the village of Asomati. There are 17 folksongs (6 kleftic songs, 5 dance songs, 4 wedding songs, 1 table song, and 1 historical song) and 25 instrumental pieces and improvisations. Many songs are no longer sung now and the older villagers knew them but could not recall the words. The principal instrument in the bands in these villages is the gaïda, and the writer offers details of its use and manufacture. She also gives details of the methodology of her transcription of the songs in European notation. The details of each song include its title, provenance, and type, the musicians, and the lyrics.

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Zarbali, Glykeria-Vassiliki: Recordings and Transcriptions of Folksongs from Neos Pandeleïmon, Pieria Prefecture, Thessaloniki, 1997
134 pp. (with a cassette of recorded music)

The writer writes down and transcribes 44 folksongs from Neos Pandeleïmon, as interpreted by ordinary villagers. The dissertation starts with general information about the history and the folklore of Neos Pandeleïmon, the methodology of the research, transcription, and classification, and biographical details about the singers. Whether from Pandeleïmon itself or variants of other songs, these songs appealed to the villagers, underwent a process of linguistic adaptation to the local dialect, and were adopted by the inhabitants as their own. They are categorised as: narrative songs, historical songs, kleftic songs, love songs, wedding songs, songs of exile, Easter songs, spring songs, and laments.

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Gaïtandzi, Evangelia: Recorded Folksongs from Serres Prefecture Sung by Refugees from Thrace, Thessaloniki, 1997
111 pp., with an appendix of research questionnaires + notes on 33 songs + 2 maps (with a cassette of recorded music)

A collection of songs of the refugees from Eastern Thrace who settled in villages in Serres prefecture, namely Neos Skopos, Ayia Eleni, Koumaria, and Zevgolatio. The songs are of particular interest because of the distinctive dialect: they contain elements from the Greek mainland and the islands and also features of the Byzantine musical tradition. The dissertation begins with information about the villages history, the methodology of the research and the transcription in European notation. The songs are grouped by area, owing to the distinctive features of each locality, particularly Ayia Eleni. The transcriptions are accompanied by comments on the mode, the singers interpretation, the content of the lyrics, and the rhythm.

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Hadzimanolis, Emmanouil: The Brass Wind Instruments in the Folk Bands in Western Macedonia, Thessaloniki 1995
vol. I: 117 pp. + 1 map + 19 photographs, vol. II: ....... (with a cassette of recorded music)

This dissertation in six chapters studies brass wind instruments as folk-music instruments all over Western and Central Macedonia: the instruments themselves (trumpet, cornet, trombone, etc.), when they appeared, the setting-up of the first folk-music bands in the region, their composition (number of members, types of instruments, position, musical role, and standing of each one in the band), and the technical features of the way the folk musicians play their brass wind instruments. Their playing is analysed in terms of the orchestration (the score). The musicians who were recorded in the course of the writers personal investigations have had no formal musical education or training, they learnt by copying, by ear, on the basis of each ones instinctive feeling for music. The material is accompanied by comments on the method of transcription in European notation and the selection of the pieces (representing each area involved in the research, Siatista, Florina, Tsotyli, Kozani), the role of the instruments in the band, comments on technical questions, and improvisation. Volume 1 contains the historical and theoretical part of the research and a musical analysis of the transcriptions contained in volume 2.

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Dzanella, Paraskevi: Recording and Transcriptions of Folksongs from Katafiyi, Kozani Prefecture, Thessaloniki, 1999
113 pp. + 1 map (with a cassette of recorded music)

Katafiyi, located where the prefectures of Katerini, Larissa, and Kozani meet (though it belongs to the latter), is in the Pieria Mountains 1,400 m above sea-level. This two-part dissertation gives historical and geographical data about the area, biographical details about the performers of the songs, and methodological information regarding the transcriptions and the organisation of the material the writer has collected. In Part 2 there are 23 songs grouped by content: love songs, engagement songs, wedding songs, kleftic songs, songs of everyday life, and satirical songs, transcribed for the European stave and accompanied by their lyrics.

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Katsaounis, Theodoros: Transcriptions of Folksongs from Katafiyi in the Pieria Mountains, Thessaloniki 1998
145 pp. + 2 photographs + 1 map (with a video and two cassettes of recorded music)

This collection comprises the transcription of 49 songs with their lyrics, with comments on the vocabulary and folklore details of the songs, and with notes on the duration of each one, its rhythm and key. Apart from some historical information in the introduction, the dissertation also includes a classification of the songs, which cover all aspects of life: love songs (winter, summer, spring, the whole year), table songs, historical songs, songs of the road, war songs, wedding songs, satirical songs, songs of exile, and miscellaneous.

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Vlahou, Angeliki: Folksongs from the Area of Adam, Thessaloniki Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1999
98 pp. + 1 map (with a cassette of recorded music)

Adam is a village in Thessaloniki prefecture in the mountains which separate it from Halkidiki. The songs in this collection have been sung in Adam since time immemorial, though many of them show influences from neighbouring areas, particularly Halkidiki, and they are very varied in terms of their rhythm, modes, and instruments. The writer focuses mainly on dance songs in seven-part and two-part rhythm, for one voice unaccompanied. Part 1 gives information about the geography, the history, and the folklore of the area, linguistic comments, and methodological details about the writing down and the transcription, and biographical information about the singer. In Part 2 the 33 songs are transcribed and grouped by type: rituals and religious customs, birth songs, songs of love, party songs, dance songs, improvisations, bantering songs, songs of praise, wedding songs, narrative songs, and songs of death. The lyrics are followed by comments on the transcription and the verse technique.

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Dodoulos, Ioannis: Recording of Folk Music: Folksongs of Halkidiki, Thessaloniki, 1996
95 pp. with 1 map and 2 photographs (with a cassette of recorded music)

This dissertation writes down the lyrics of and transcribes into European notation (insofar as this is possible with Greek folk music) 30 folksongs, mainly from Fourka in Halkidiki, in the sw of the Kassandra peninsula. The songs are grouped in two basic categories: table songs and dance songs. The latter are further subdivided by rhythm into syrta kalamatiana (7/8) and syrta (2/4 or 4/4). A separate category of dance songs consists of those in which the dancers face each other and dance in 9/8 time. A few of the songs are not categorised.

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Tarseni, Sophia: Recording and Transcriptions of Folksongs from Kalloni and Kyparissi in Grevena Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1999
130 pp. with 1 map and 2 photographs (with a cassette of recorded music)

Part 1 of the dissertation contains historical and geographical information about the area from which the songs in this collection originate, which is mainly the communities of Kyparissi and Kalloni, together with details of the local musical tradition. There is also information about how the material was collected, the singers biographical details, and methodological observations concerning the transcription of the songs in European notation. They are classified according to their subject matter as lyrical (love songs), epic (kleftic songs), and family songs (laments and songs of exile). In Part 2 are the transcriptions of all 20 songs, together with their lyrics. These are accompanied by notes about the duration of each piece, its rhythm, the poetic metre, other recorded variants, and comments on the melody. The conclusions draw together the writers observations on all the subjects outlined above.

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Yaleniou, Maria: Yeoryios Vakalopoulos as a Composer of Childrens Songs, Thessaloniki 1996
122 pp. with an appendix with the scores of 9 childrens songs

From 1920 onwards, Yeoryios Vakalopoulos (b. Ayios Efstratios 1889, d. Thessaloniki 1956), composer, theory teacher, and spiritual mentor, taught higher theory and composition in the State Conservatory in Thessaloniki, where he was later appointed Deputy Director. The dissertation gives biographical information about this composer and teacher, and details his contribution to intellectual and artistic life in Thessaloniki both as a teacher  describing how he taught harmony and his views on the tonal system of music  and as a composer, with an account of his œuvre, which is kept in the State Conservatory in Thessaloniki: symphonies for choir and orchestra, chamber music, songs for choir and for choir and piano, childrens songs, and religious works for choir. Lastly, the writer makes a musicological analysis of 9 of his childrens songs for voice and piano.

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Kosmidou, Vassiliki: Folksongs from Nikiti, Thessaloniki 1994
vol. I (text) 127 pp. with 1 map and 16 photographs, vol. II (analyses of music and lyrics) 42 pp. (with a cassette of recorded music)

This three-part dissertation gives details of the history and folklore of Nikiti, groups the songs in the collection according to content, presents the methodology of the transcriptions, and gives the transcriptions of 44 songs. The instruments heard accompanying the songs are clarinet, violin, and uti (Arabic lute or ûd). Many of the songs had been forgotten, other had been adulterated. The informants were inhabitants of Nikiti, not professional musicians, who had learnt the songs through the oral tradition, all of them, men and women, past middle age. The songs  dance songs, table songs, historical songs, songs of exile, satirical songs, love songs, narrative songs, wedding songs, and songs about brigands  are written down in no particular order and transcribed, their lyrics are given, a note is made of their variations and repetitions, comments are made about the melody, the rhythm, the mode, and the time of the songs and of their verse technique.

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Zarbali, Eleni: Folksongs from Deskati, Grevena Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1997
115 pp. with 1 map and 5 photographs (with a cassette of recorded music)

This dissertation analyses folksongs from Deskati, noting down the melody and also discussing their style and functionality. The 16 songs are grouped as: love songs, wedding songs, table songs, songs for Christmas and New Year, Carnival songs, Easter songs, shepherds songs, and laments. A separate chapter gives the lyrics of other songs which were recorded during the research but are not examined musicologically. The songs included either originate in the Deskati area or are variations on other songs which appealed to the local people, who sang them, adapted them to their own linguistic idiom, and adopted them as their own. The dissertation is rounded out by some general information about the history and folklore of the Deskati area, notes on the methodology of the research and the transcription in European notation, and comments on the songs linguistic form. The linguistic record of the songs is precise, without addition or supplementation.

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Koutsou, Kassiani: Songs from Vrastama in Halkidiki: Transcriptions, Thessaloniki 1999
117 pp. with an appendix of local place-names + 1 map (with a cassette of recorded music)

Vrastama or Vrasta is a village in Halkidiki, isolated and remote, a closed society, difficult of access, but with a musical tradition that is still very much alive. The songs are monophonic, mainly dance songs in seven-part rhythm. There are also slow songs (table songs and laments), but obviously the more cheerful songs and the dance songs are easier to transmit orally and to preserve in the singers memories. The local instruments are clarinet, violin, zurna, tabor, bagpipes, lute, and drum. Many of the songs are sung in the rest of Halkidiki too with variations from village to village in the melody or the words. Part One gives information about the history, geography, and folklore of the village and the locality, biographical details of those who participated in the recordings, and the methodology of the research, the recording, and the transcription of the songs. Part Two contains the transcriptions, the lyrics with the repetitions, the music, variations on the lyrics, glossaries where necessary, and comments on the melody, the lyrics, and the functionality of each song. The writer presents a total of 23 songs, grouped as: variants, love songs, wedding songs, religious songs, devotional songs, and songs of exile.

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Kyrtsani, Maria: Operas Staged in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 1990
85 pp. with lists of composers, operas, operettas, musicals, ballets, conductors, singers, and organisations and other bodies that have appeared in Thessaloniki

The dissertation traces operatic activity in Thessaloniki from the beginning of the 20th century to the end of the 1980s, recording the operas, operettas, and ballets that were staged in the city. On the basis of the daily press and the archives of local cultural associations, other literature being extremely scarce, the writer discusses not the general history of lyric theatre in Greece, but opera-related activities in Thessaloniki. The performances are listed in chronological order, in two broad periods: from the beginning of the century to 1945 and from 1945 to 1989. The dissertation is interspersed with information about the general historical context of each period or subperiod, with information about the citys cultural background, against which the operas were staged, and the impact of their staging on the citys musical and cultural life. The writer also mentions the professional and amateur groups who gave performances in the city, whether local people, Greek touring companies, or groups invited from abroad. As far as possible, she also notes the names of those involved in the performances, the venues, the dates, and the organisers.

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Athanassiou, Evyenia: The 20-Year Career (19531973) of the Choir of the Music Department of the Students Union of the Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 1996
133 pp. + appendix: 32 numbered pp. list of the choirs concert programmes, list of soloists who sang with the choir, 13 photographs, and 28 unnumbered pp. of scores, programmes, and newspaper cuttings

The subject of the dissertation is the 20-year career (195373) of the choir of the Music Department of the Students Union of the Aristotle University in Thessaloniki. A brief historical review of the city of Thessaloniki includes a chronicle of music from the beginning to the middle of the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on choral and musical activity centring on the Aristotle University until pre-1953. This is followed by an account of how the choir was founded, its organisation and structure, a list of its activities during the twenty years it existed, and biographical data relating to its founders and members. The writer also lists the choirs live peformances both in Greece (Thessaloniki and other Greek towns and cities) and abroad (in European choir festivals). She presents the choir as the organising body behind cultural events, mainly choral meetings; outlines its repertory, mainly the works it premiered, in Greece or globally; gives a discography; and talks about the choirs appearances on the radio. The dissertation concludes with comments and thoughts about the choirs general presence in, and its contribution to, the musical life of the country.

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Polyhroniadis, Yeoryios E.: Traditional Music of the Edessa Area Interpreted by a Folk Brass Band, Thessaloniki 1992
130 pp. + 10 photographs, newspaper cutting, and transcription of 4 dances from the Edessa area played by the band

An original account and examination of four traditional dances from the Edessa area played by a local traditional brass band known as the Nyssis Band. The instrumental execution of the dances is dominated by the homophonic style with the trumpet dominating, the line of the melody is tropic, its roots lie in ancient Greek music, and the metrical structure may also probably be traced back to ancient Greek prosody. Apart from general data relating to Edessa, the dissertation also presents the general characteristics of the dances and their music, their names, the instruments heard playing them, and the band making the recording. Then the dances are analysed musically, kinetically, and structurally (morphologically and tropically).

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Dinopoulos, Konstandinos: The Songs of Roumlouki, Thessaloniki 1997
123 pp. with appendix 1 map and 5 photographs

The collection contains 39 songs from the area of the Imathian plain from the northern edges of the Pieria Mountains to the boundary of the old Yannitsa Lake and from the heights of Veria to the River Loudias and the mouth of the Aliakmon. Songs with a slow musical section at the beginning, which evolves towards the end into a rapid outburst. The writer gives information about the history and the folklore of the area, and details about the informants and singers, all of them elderly inhabitants of the villages of Imathia. The songs are transcribed in European notation and the lyrics are given. The dissertation concludes with comments on the content of the lyrics and other musicological observations.

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Gourani, Theodora: Transcriptions of Traditional Dances and Songs of the Areas of Edessa and Almopia: Brass Bands, Thessaloniki 1998
141 pp. + 1 map + 7 photographs

The brass bands appeared in the Edessa and Almopia area in the second decade of the 20th century and are still the basic vehicle of traditional instrumental music in these areas. The members are self-taught and pass their art on usually to the younger members of their families. This dissertation contributes to the study of Greek folk music by offering a musical record of traditional dances and songs (which are part of the tradition of the Edessa and Almopia areas). The participants are two brass bands: the NyssisYannakis band and the Yorgos Ouroumis band. The dissertation is rounded out with details of the history of the areas, details of methodology and recording, general details about the brass bands and their instruments in these areas, specific references to the two bands, sources of the songs that are recorded, and finally the methodology of the transcription of the 12 dances and songs (some performed vocally and some instrumentally) which have been recorded and are performed by the two bands.

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Tassioula, Panayota: Transcriptions of Folksongs from Grevena Prefecture on the Themes of Love and Marriage, Thessaloniki 1998
347 pp. + appendix 2 maps and 7 photographs

This dissertation records and preserves 38 songs from the rich musical tradition of the Grevena area. The main part of the dissertation consists of transcriptions of the songs in European notation, supplemented by details of their duration, their poetic metre, details about the singer, the lyrics (with and without repetitions), the rhythm, the mode (or scale) to which the songs belong, other information about the song, other recorded musical or textual variants, and explanations of vocabulary where necessary. The introduction gives information about the history of Grevena, the local peoples occupations and economic situation, and the relationship between the musical tradition of the local villages and their inhabitants daily life. The dissertation is rounded out with details of the methodology of the research and the recording, the singers biographical details, the methodology of the transcription and the related problems, and the findings of the ethnomusicological research.

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Dzima, Afroditi: Folksongs of Samarina, Grevena Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1998
176 pp. + 1 map, and appendix with the lyrics of 9 unanalysed songs (with a cassette of recorded music)

This collection comprises 20 songs: dance songs, laments, engagement and wedding songs, Easter songs, table and company songs, kleftic songs, love songs, and songs sung on 15 August. Apart from information about the geography, history, and folklore of Samarina, the dissertation also discusses the transcription of the songs in European notation, their melody and rhythm, a metrical analysis of the lyrics, the metre, the melody, and linguistic aspects of the songs. Supplementary information relates to the songs content and history and to variations on the lyrics. The songs are characterised by variety in their verse technique, rhythm, modes, and musical setting.

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Stathopoulou, Eleni: Transcriptions of Carnival Songs from Kozani, Thessaloniki 1999
76 pp. + appendix 2 unnumbered pp. of photographs (with a cassette of recorded music)

The dissertation deals with typical Carnival songs from Kozani. The writer collected her data about Carnival customs from singers who have taken part in Carnival events and also from her own experiences and observations of events. Her purpose in including the folklore data was to outline the context in which the songs were brought to life. The transcriptions seek to render the melody of the pieces accurately. The introduction and the folklore data are followed by the transcriptions of the songs, with comments on the lyrics, the melody, and the rhythm. There are 19 songs in all, and they are grouped in 4 categories: songs of dashing Greek youth, love songs, satirical songs, and domestic songs. Rhythmic, strophic, slow, or fast and cheerful, all the local Carnival songs are sung antiphonically: one person sings the first line and all the other singers repeat it together. Satirical, ribald, and obscene songs are mostly sung in male company. Apart from in the square, they are also danced at crossroads and in open spaces at night on the eve of some Carnival celebration.

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Dani, Anna: The Work of Dimitris Themelis as a Composer and Musicologist, Thessaloniki 1999
131 pp. with 3 appendices: concert and lecture programmes, concert programmes, and photographs

This is an initial endeavour to produce a systematic record and presentation of Themeliss (b. Thessaloniki 1931) achievements as a composer and musicologist. He studied music at the State Conservatory in Thessaloniki and the University of Munich, was a founder member of the Rotunda String Orchestra (1957), and was Director of the State Conservatory in Thessaloniki, where he taught in the Department of Musical Studies. Apart from giving violin recitals, he also composed some notable works for voice and piano, voice and string orchestra, choir, piano, and chamber music. The four chapters of this dissertation outline Themeliss life and work, present his work as a musicologist, and essentially gives a catalogue of his publications and lectures and of his works (by date and by subject). The dissertation concludes with an interview which Themelis granted to the writer.

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Poularaki, Ekaterini: Recording of Folk Music: Pontic Songs from the Veria Area, Thessaloniki 1994
98 pp. (with a cassette of recorded music)

The dissertation looks at 34 songs, categorised as: akritic songs, wedding songs, love songs, historical songs, religious songs, laments, situational songs, narrative songs, and songs of exile. The brief introduction gives details of the history and folklore of the area and methodological explanations regarding the writing down and the transcription of the songs (lyrics and melody).

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Tsoka, Panayota: Andoniou, Astrinidis, Kouroupos, and Tenidis: Music for Performances of Ancient Drama by the State Thetare of Northern Greece, Thessaloniki 1996
111 pp. + lengthy appendix of musical works (scores, notes, opinions) by the composers

Like all music for the theatre, music for performances of ancient drama confines itself to serving the specific artistic event, which is limited in space and time. Once the creation and the expression of the specific theatrical event are over, so is the functional purpose of the musical creation that accompanies it. Unlike music that is written to be performed in concert halls, theatre music remains unpublished, despite the indubitable artistic merit of much of it. This dissertation presents and examines musical works written by four specific composers for performances of ancient drama by the State Theatre of Northern Greece, these being among the many major composers with whom the countrys second-ranking theatre has worked. The selection of the four was based on the adequacy of the written archival musical material for the specific works, material which is supplemented with written and oral information about the music for the works and other data which help the reader to appreciate factors that directly or indirectly influenced the composition (decisions by the stage director, the composers own aims and influences). There is no extensive, profound analysis of each musical work. Of the six chapters, two concern methodological and theoretical musicological questions and each of the other four is devoted to one of the composers. The writer gives biographical details, discusses each ones career in the theatre, particularly with regard to ancient drama, and presents their works for performances of ancient drama by the State Theatre of Northern Greece.

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Vassilakis, Alexandros: Recording of Folk Music: Folksongs from Kozani Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1996
113 pp. with 1 map (with a cassette of recorded music)

The folksongs of Kozani show the influence of Epirot and Thessalian folksongs, for many of the local people are from those regions. However, the Kozani folksongs do have a clear identity of their own. This dissertation presents in European notation 21 unknown and unpublished pieces from the communities of Ano Lefkopiyi, Velvendos, Elati, Dilofos, and Voskohori as sung by elderly villagers, both men and women. They are grouped as love songs, songs of exile, bucolic songs, wedding songs, historical songs, songs of the underworld, songs for Easter Week, bantering songs, prison songs, and miscellaneous. The dissertation is rounded off with information about the villages, and the transcription relates to the music and the lyrics.

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Petkaki, Fotini: Songs from Trilofos, Thessaloniki Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1994
146 pp. (with a cassette of recorded music)

This dissertation presents, transcribes, and analyses 22 folksongs from the village of Trilofos in Thessaloniki prefecture, as preserved in the memories and recorded from the charismatic voices of simple village folk. The introduction offers comments on the methodology of the research and the writing down of the songs, data relating to local history, folklore, and music, and linguistic characteristics of the local dialect. Part Two groups the songs as table songs (fast and slow), Christmas and New Year songs, and lullabies, and presents the conclusions of a musicological analysis. Part Three is an appendix with details of the songs in the collection: lyrics, type, singer, and details of the recording.

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Lazaridou. Eleni: The Daïrés in the Drama Area, Thessaloniki 1993
71 pp. with photographs interspersed throughout

General information about the history, culture, and folklore of the Drama area is followed by an account of how a daïrés is made and used there, using as an example for study five different traditional and experienced bands from the communities of Xiropotamos, Petroussa, Piryi, Kali Vryssi, and Volakas, all in Drama prefecture (a total of 25 musicians and singers). The musicians usually make their own instruments. In these bands, one or two daïrédes play with one lyre or gaïda (sometimes two) and a flute. The successful rhythm of the melody of the song or the dance depends on the beat of the daïrés. There are also seven songs transcribed in three-part, four-part, two-part, and seven-part rhythm.

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Afendouli, Maria: Folksongs of Vavdos in Halkidiki, Thessaloniki 1992
344 pp. with photographs throughout, an appendix of 1 map and 15 photographs, and bibliography (with a cassette of recorded music)

The folksongs of Vavdos share certain characteristics in terms of their melodic and musical structure. The dissertation begins by examining details of local history and folklore, gives information about the informants and musicians and their instruments, offers linguistic comments on the dialect of Vavdos, and discusses the methodology of the transcription. The 21 songs are grouped as love songs, historical songs, satirical songs, laments, narrative songs, and wedding songs. The latter are discussed extensively and in depth, as the writer follows the course of a traditional wedding and all its related customs from before the wedding day to the end of the first week of marriage. Ten of the songs are for solo voice, the other 11 have an instrumental accompaniment, dominated by the clarinet. The songs are transcribed and the writer gives the lyrics and the repetitions, and comments on the rhythm, metre, and verse technique, the melody and its relationship to the lyrics, and the role of the instruments in each song.

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Gourvelou, Irini: Music for the Performances Staged by the State Theatre of Northern Greece from 1961 to 1971: A Contribution to the Description of the Existing Archive, Thessaloniki 1995
316 pp. with 3 appendices (correspondence, plans, and the legislative decree for the founding of the theatre; list of works staged in the 196172 seasons; photographic material) and alphabetical indexes of works, musicians, and playwrights + 35 unnumbered pages of the scores for the music for Brechts Good Person of Szechuan

In the period 196171, the State Theatre of Northern Greece (KTVE) staged 11 tragedies by all the ancient tragedians and 4 comedies by Aristophanes, a total of 15 works from the ancient Greek repertory. Of the remaining 77 staged during this period, 32 were by Greek theatrical writers, both classical and modern, and the rest were by non-Greek playwrights. This four-chapter dissertation outlines the theatrical life of Thessaloniki from 1912 to the founding of the KTVE; presents its archive, with an analytical description of its contents and a rundown of the problems involved in organising and using the material; gives information about the music for 21 works (though none from the ancient Greek repertory) from the archival material, for which the selection criterion was whether the composer was mentioned in the programme for the play. The music for these plays, which was written especially for these performances and played live or recorded, is scrupulously described, with comments on the scores and the related stage action. No musical text from the scores is analysed or transcribed, nor did the writer even listen to the music, because her purpose is not to analyse the musical works, but to describe the music in the Theatre archive for the plays staged during its first decade. Regarding the rest of the musical works from this period, she gives only a little informaton taken from the programmes of the performances.

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Goloï, Yerakina: The Musical and Poetical Structure of Songs from Poliyiros in Halkidiki, Thessaloniki 1998
241 pp. (with a cassette of recorded music)

The dissertation presents 22 songs: love songs, kleftic songs, songs of exile, wedding songs, narrative songs, and didactic songs, some of which were recorded without instrumental accompaniment, some with one singer and instrumental accompaniment, some with a group of singers and instrumental accompaniment, and some with a lead singer, a group of singers, and instrumental accompaniment. For each song, the writer notes the title or the first line, the provenance, the type (for dancing to or listening to while seated), the performers, the lyrics, the verse technique, with comments on the musical setting, the repetitions, the vocabulary when necessary, the subject matter, the place of the instruments in the music, and the instrumental parts. The dissertation is rounded out with information about the history and folklore of Halkidiki, linguistic comments on the local dialect of Poliyiros, details of research methodology, writing down, and transcription, and biographical information about the performers.

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Papaspyrou, Despina: Transcriptions of Folksongs from the Hortiatis Area (Ardameri and Peristera) and the Yannitsa Area (Palaifyto), Thessaloniki 1995
153 pp. with 2 maps and 13 photographs (with a cassette of recorded music)

The writer records and transcribes a total of 50 songs from the 3 communities of Ardameri and Peristera in the Hortiatis area, Thessaloniki prefecture, and Palaifyto in the Yannitsa area, the songs from the latter being songs brought by refugees from Eastern Thrace and Asia Minor. The songs are grouped separately for each village as: love songs, Christmas and New Year songs, wedding songs, songs of exile, prison songs, laments, historical and kleftic songs, and miscellaneous. The writer gives details about her research, her informants, the singers, her methodology for transcription in European notation, the mode and rhythmic treatment of the melody, and the lyrics and their known variants.

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Kouziaki, Maria: Folksongs from Lefkopiyi, Kozani Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1999
182 pp. with 4 photographs and 1 map

The writer presents 28 songs from Lefkopiyi, Kozani prefecture, womens songs which have been handed down from generation to generation, usually within the same family, and sung on various occasions throughout the year. For this reason the material is classified in accordance with the calendar or the human life cycle: New Year songs, Carnival songs, songs sung on Lazarus Saturday and Palm Sunday, Easter songs, Mayday songs, wedding songs, lullabies and dandling songs, various winter songs, and laments. The songs are rhythmic and strophic and are sung in groups antiphonally. The material is accompanied by details of the methodology relating to the research, transcription, and classification, details of verse technique, comments on language and metre, and details of history and folklore, mainly relating to the customs associated with the festivals. The transcription of the songs is followed by an analysis of the music and lyrics, together with the lyrics, comments on the verse technique, the rhythm, and the melody.

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Dzenou, Magdalini A.: Recordings of Folk Music: Folksongs from the Nigrita Area, Serres Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1997
238 pp. (with a cassette of recorded music)

This dissertation writes down, transcribes, and analyses 34 songs, love songs, aphoristic songs, wedding songs, songs of exile, satirical songs, kleftic songs, and historical songs from the area of Nigrita in Serres prefecture. They are mainly dance songs (for a wide variety of dances), though some are table songs, which have an added characteristic in that there is a different singer for each line, so the songs goes around the table from singer to singer.

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Mehteridou, Sophia: Songs from Pieria Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1997
106 pp.

The dissertation presents 18 songs in all, 14 from Ayios Pandeleïmon with a female singer, and 4 from Elatohori with all the villagers singing. The dissertation is in two parts, one for each village. The songs from Elatohori are sung by two groups, a group of men and a group of women, who sing in chorus antiphonically. These features have remained unchanged down the ages and are characteristic of primitive musical societies. The songs from Ayios Panedeleïmon are all table songs: kleftic songs, historical songs, love songs, wedding songs, songs of exile, and laments, all in 15-syllable iambic metre, strophic, in trihemistichs: each strophe consists of three lines, each of which constitutes an organic hemistich with the next, and the last line of each verse is repeated as the first line of the next. The songs have many repetitions, trills, and improvisations.

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Bazakoyanni, Styliani: Transcriptions of Folksongs from Lagadas, Thessaloniki 1998
149 pp. with 1 map and 5 photographs within the text

The writer transcribes 51 songs from Asia Minor, Thrace, the Pontus, and Lagadas, and categorises them as: fire-walking songs, love songs, wedding songs, Christmas and New Year songs, songs for St Georges Day, kleftic and historical songs, songs of exile, and general. Apart from details of the methodology of the transcription, the dissertation also gives information about local history and folklore.

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Dagas, Dimitrios: Recordings of Folksongs: Songs from the Serres Area, Thessaloniki 1996
88 pp. with 1 map and 2 photographs (with a cassette of recorded music)

The singers of this collection live in the village of Kato Kamila, Serres prefecture, but many of the recorded songs were brought by refugees from Adrianople and Scutari in Asia Minor, who settled in the area. The songs are categorised according to this basic geographical division, followed by an internal classification based on circumstance or content. Twenty of the songs come from Scutari: dance songs, wedding songs, and company songs. Eleven are from Adrianople: work songs, serenades, dance songs, company songs, and religious songs. The songs from the Serres area are 1 serenade from Nigrita, 1 night-song from Skopos, and 2 religious songs from Kato Kamila. The songs are categorised and their geographical origin identified by the writers informants, who also explain how each song was handed down to them.

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Yeragotelli, Papadoula: Recording and Transcriptions of Folksongs from Kastoria Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1997
114 pp. (with a cassette of recorded music)

In the introduction, the dissertation gives details about the research and the collecting and recording of the songs in this collection, and also includes details of the history of Kastoria prefecture and biographical information about the singers. These are 35 songs: wedding songs, songs of exile, laments, Carnival songs, Christmas songs a miscellany of table and dance songs from Kastoria, Yerma, Vogatsiko, and Kostarazi, presented in the order in which they were recorded. The writer notes the lyrics, mentions the best-known variants, and transcribes the songs in European notation.

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Krystallidou, Zoumboulia: Transcriptions of Folksongs from the Kozani Area (Servia, Lava, Velvendos), Thessaloniki 1996
149 pp. with 1 map (with a cassette of recorded music)

The dissertation gives some brief information about the history of the area, details of the research, information about the singers, and includes the transcriptions and the lyrics of 39 songs: patriotic and heroic songs, songs of sorrow and heartache, songs of revelry and merrymaking, wedding songs, miscellaneous songs, love songs, songs of exile, laments, songs about choosing a wife, table songs, and kleftic songs.

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Fournidzi, Theodora: Recordings of Folksongs: Folksongs from Polydendri, Imathia Prefecture, Thessaloniki 1996
125 pp. with 1 map and 8 photographs (with a cassette of recorded music)

The dissertation presents and transcribes the music and the lyrics of 22 songs from Polydendri, Imathia prefecture: kleftic songs, love songs, engagement songs, wedding songs, Carnival songs, Vlach songs, seasonal (spring) songs, and songs for special occasions. The dissertation is rounded out with details of the research and the transcription, information about the folklore of Polydendri, and supplementary notes on the lyrics.

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Chrissochoidis, Ilias: The Life and Works of Nicholas Astrinidis: A First Approach, Thessaloniki, 1992
500 pp. with appendices, including photographs and musical scores

The first comprehensive study of Greek composer Nicholas Astrinidis (b. 1922). The son of a Thracian immigrant in Romania, Astrinidis saw his family dismembered by the events of World War II. Following the Soviet invasion of Bessarabia, he was forced to move to the Middle East, where he enlisted in the Greek army and was wounded in the battlefield. After the war he settled in Paris, where he completed his musical studies and began a promising career as a pianist and composer. He spent the 1950s in concert tours throughout the world. His long fascination with Macedonia’s history found expression in the oratorio “Saint Demetrios” (1962), a monumental symphonic work commissioned by the municipality of Thessaloniki to celebrate the Jubilee of the city’s liberation. Its successful premiere was instrumental in Astrinidis’s decision to settle in Thessaloniki. Since 1964 he has served the cultural life of the city prodigiously as a performer, conductor, educator and, above all, composer. His works span the whole gamut of musical genres, combine Greek folklore with advanced tonal language and brilliant orchestration, and are consistently inspired by Macedonian history.

The dissertation provides a detailed biography of Astrinidis, a comprehensive discussion of his musical style, a full list of his compositions and analyses of representative works. It is intended as the factual ground for all subsequent research on his life and works.

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