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TravellingModern MacedoniaThessalonikiThessaloniki up to the 19th centuryThe Greek neighbourhoods in modern Thessaloniki

The Greek neighbourhoods in modern Thessaloniki

The Egnatia neighbourhood

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The Greek neighbourhoods of modern Thessaloniki
Map of the Greek neighbourhoods of Thessaloniki before 1917, drawn by Albert Narr, 1500-1917, Thessaloniki, Museum of the Jewish Community.

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The Greek neighbourhoods of modern Thessaloniki

The foreign regime dictated the appearance of the enslaved population's homes: they had to be lower than those of the Turks, while the facades of Greek churches were forbidden to face the street.

The size of the Greek neighborhoods shrank steadily as the conquerors installed themselves in the city; the moving of the Rotunda community to a location further south in 1591 was indicative of this trend.

The most densely populated Greek district was that of Ayios Athanasios, though there were others scattered about the town, around the Vlatadon Monastery (Tsaous Monastir), along the Egnatia and around the cathedral of Grigorios Palamas, and interspersed among the Jewish quarters. The wooden houses, with their enclosed balconies and tile roofs, were typical of the Balkan architecture during the Ottoman occupation.

See Also
Travelling - The Jewish neighbourhoods in modern Thessaloniki


Macedonian Heritage
Content courtesy Ekdotike Athenon S.A.